David’s Hat’s Inaugural Tour

This is David’s Hat’s first tour!

David's hat looks out over Dover ports with a waiting ferry ready to embark on it's next journey across the English channel. Dover castle dominates the distant skyline.
David’s hat looks out over Dover ports with a waiting ferry ready to embark on it’s next journey across the English channel. Dover castle dominates the distant skyline.

 

 

 

We’re at Dover, and there’s a couple of hours before the ferry is due to take on so I am going through last minute stuff ready for the journey. It’s a lovely day so I thought I’d get a shot of the hat looking out over the ferry port.

There’s a rough itinerary but as people know I change my mind like my socks and I could be 1,000 miles from where I said I was going. I’m a Libran so I can’t make my mind up. 

I was actually at the port for 2 days as I had other business in Folkestone and Dover, so sleeping each night at this spot with the view in the photo was exciting. I was literally counting the hours down.

 

 

 


Bray-Dunes in Dunkirk, northern France. This is David’s hat’s first trip and stop off point. 

David's hat looks out over the beach of Bray-Dunes.
David’s hat looks out over the beach of Bray-Dunes.

David’s hat looks out over the beach of Bray-Dunes, where for over a week starting on 26th May 1940, British, French and Belgian soldiers were rescued from the beaches by one of the most amazing collections of craft ever seen. Even small, private fishing boats crossed the channel to help rescue the stranded soldiers. 198,000 British, 123,000 French and 16,000 Belgians escaped by sea while a small number of soldiers sacrificed their lives trying to halt the German advance and protect the rescue.

The Wreck of the Devonia
The Wreck of the Devonia

The beach is enormous and you can feel the sense of history as you walk along and spot the wrecks still lying on the shore, mostly visible only at low tide. This photo shows the Devonia, a paddle steamer which was deliberately beached after taking heavy damage and used as a boarding stage for soldiers onto other vessels. In the background you can see the yellow buoys which mark the spot where the Crested Eagle, also a paddle steamer was sunk by German air-planes with the loss of 300 lives. 

David’s hat had to be fixed to a memorial plaque as it was quite windy, but I think this is the best shot I got. You can’t tell but it was really windy that day so I had to fasten it to the notice board using the dogs lead lol I think I’ll fix some velcro straps on the inside for the future to make securing it more easy. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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